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Deflated Balloon experiment

1.) Fill 2 liter bottle to the brim with water 2.) Place a deflated balloon over the mouth of the bottle 3.) Poke a small hole in the side of the bottle, bear the base, with a nail 4.) Observer the behavior of the balloon 5.) Lift the balloon up into the air and pull up on it several times until it gets pushed down into the bottle. Observer the distance the water travels through the hole as you are dong this. 6.) Once the balloon is inside the bottle and completely inverted, blow air into it to inflate it….

BAKING POWDER SUBMARINE EXPERIMENT

Here’s how to make your own Baking Powder in less than a minute. 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon cream of tartar   Mix both together and you have Baking Powder.   After you get your submarine ready, put some Baking powder in the bottom and let it sink to the bottom.   The baking powder will come in contact with water, which will in turn cause a chemical reaction. This reaction will produce air bubbles along the bottom of the potato, causing it to rise back to the surface. When the submarine gets to the surface, the bubbles will…

Centrifugal sprinkler (Sprinkler Straw) Experiment

Centrifugal sprinkler this is a very fun and messy Hands-on experiment (physics, mechanics, inertia, centrifugal force, pump). A straw and a skewer can turn into a pump with a twist of your fingers! Once you have secured anything you want to stay dry, this fun experiment is a good way to introduce centrifugal forces and the principle behind many pumps.   When you spin the straw it forces the water inside to spin. If an object is spinning anything on that object appears to feel a force pushing it outward.   This means that in your straw the water is…

Bernoulli Principle with balloons Experiment

Like everything else, the balloons are surrounded by air pressure. When I blew between them with the straw, I changed the pressure. Either the air between them stopped pushing as hard, or the air on the outer sides began pushing harder. Which do you think happened? As air squeezed between the balloons, it sped up, and lost pressure, and stopped pushing as hard. So the higher pressure of the air on the outer sides of the balloons pushed them together.   What would happen if you blew along the outer side of one of the balloon? When I blew on…

Baking Soda Powered Boat experiment

This baking soda experiment boat is a fun hands on experiment. To make it go farther try doing it in the bathtub. You can also experiment with the amount of baking soda and vinegar you add to see if it goes faster or farther.   What’s going on? If you mix baking soda and vinegar, you get a chemical reaction which creates carbon dioxide gas. When this happens inside your bottle boat, the gas only has one way to escape, and that’s out the straw. The gas flying down the straw and out the back pushes the boat forwards.  …

Balloon water pump Experiment

Air pressure outside the balloon pushes the air in the balloon into the bottle which takes up more space and pushes the water up the straw and out.   You can put a valve between the balloon and the bottle or a clothespin to stop the air and make your own drinking fountain.  

Rocket Pinwheel Wind Power EXPERIMENT

The Wind powered balloon pinwheel is an example of Newton’s Third Law of Motion, which states that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. When you have blown up a balloon and let it go you’ve experienced this law by watching the balloon fly around as the air comes out. Air has mass and is made of molecules. The air molecules that are pushed out of the balloon push against the molecules in the atmosphere creating a reaction force called thrust that acts on the balloon. Thrust acts on the balloon with equal force, and in the…

Straw Air Motor Propeller Experiment

This Fun and easy experiment is great for kids. Taping different color pieces of paper or tape on the propeller to make fun designs.   When you blow into the straw and an air exits from the first and second incisions. Thus, the air turns propeller. The faster you blow the faster the propeller will spin.  

The Ineffective Drinking Straw experiment

How to discover how air pressure affects the operation of a drinking straw? 1) Please a straw in your mouth with the other end in the glass of water. 2) Place a second straw in your mouth, but do not place the other en in the water. 3) Attempt to drink from the first straw. Are you successful?   Science behind it. You do not actually suck liquid through a straw. Air pressure pushing on the surface of a liquid forces liquid up the straw and into your mouth. SAY WHAT?   This happens when you reduce the pressure inside…

Homemade Water Thermometer Experiment

Materials: Stove, Drill, Jar with lid, clear straw, frying pan and food coloring.   Safety Precautions: Perform only under adult supervision. Excise caution with hot water. Handle jar bottle with pot holders as the water is very hot.   Procedure: Drill a hole in the in the top of the jar lid so that a drinking straw will fit snugly through it. Fill the jar with water to the brim. add a few drops of food coloring. Place lid on the jar. Insert straw through the hole in the jar lid so that it touches the bottom of the jar….

Magic Breath Experiment

Procedure 1 Fill cup A with 200 mL of water. 2 Put 10-12 drops of phenolphthalein solution in cup A with water 3 Add Sodium Carbonate to cup B 4 Pour cup A into cup B 5 Insert the straw into the cup and blow OUTWARD. 6 The color will start to change back to colorless.   Explanation Phenolphthalein is an acid/base indicator. It is colorless when it is an acid and pink when it is a base.   Phenolphthalein is added to water, which is then poured into a second cup B containing a base (sodium carbonate). If the…

Slingshot Straw Rocket Experiment

To launch, hold the rocket by the straw right below the paper clip or if you leave room on the bottom. Hook the rubber band with the paper clip and pull back. Point it straight up in the air. Never point at other people. As you let go of the rocket, flick the craft stick forward.   The energy the rocket needs for flight comes from the rubber band. Rubber bands are a great example of potential energy. Potential energy is energy that is stored up, not being used, just waiting to be unleashed. Think about when you stretch a…

Boyle’s Law in a Bottle experiment

Materials: Balloon, Straw, Bottle, Safety goggles & Fizz-keeper   Safety Precautions: Wear safety goggles. To avoid over pressurizing the bottle, do not pump up the bottle with the fizz-keeps more than 100 times. When releasing the pressure, unscrew the Fizz-Keeper slowly from the bottle. Never aim the Fizz-Keeper at another person, and never place your face directly over the Fizz-Keeper, especially when unscrewing it from the bottle. Never use the Fizz-Keeper with a glass bottle.   Procedure: Blow up balloon inside of a 2-liter bottle and tie it off. The balloon can be of any size. You must insert a…

Straw mister Experiment

As you blow through the straw, the air rushes out with great speed. So the air goes over the other straw with even greater speed. This leads to a low pressure over the other straw in the water and water rises in this straw. The Rising water hits the air and becomes a mist/spray.   The creation of low pressure due to high speed air is according to Bernoulli’s principle. This is the same principle which says that we should not stand near a fast moving train, as low pressure created there can suck us towards the train and consequences…

Homopolar motor experiment

SAFETY NOTE: Neodymium magnets are extremely strong and MUST BE KEPT OUT OF REACH OF SMALL CHILDREN! Do not give them to any child who might put them in their mouth, they are dangerous if swallowed and must be surgically removed!   For more about neodymium magnets safety and precautions go here Additionally neodymium magnets can interfere with electronic devices so please keep them away from phones! Also please note that these motors do heat up. See our TIPS section for safety precautions.   TIPS & PRECAUTIONS: • MONITOR THESE FOR HEAT! Some of the motors that got going really…

Copper pipe with neodymium Experiment

It is 1834, and you have just heard of this marvelous new phenomenon called eddy currents. Some fellow named Lenz discovered them, and you’re curious if you can find out something special about them yourself.   When you drop your magnet through a copper tube, it slows down. The magnet will also slide down the cookie sheet slowly.   Magnetic fields are the result of electric currents. Changing a magnetic field next to a non-magnetic metal will induce an electric field in the metal, which subsequently generates a magnetic field with an opposite orientation with respect to your magnet.  …

Use Staples to see the Magnetic Field Experiment

PROCEDURE 1) Squeeze your stapler with no paper in it, and collect 20 bent staples. 2) Put staples on piece a paper (I use card stock). 3) Then pull paper over a magnet just so the magnet and paper do not touch.   Place a bar magnet under a piece of paper. Sprinkle the staples around the magnet. What happens to the staples? How do they align themselves with respect to the magnet? They align themselves according to the direction of the magnetic field. At the poles of the magnet, the staples are straight up and down; in the middle…

Dry Ice Bubbles Experiment

Instead of the dry ice just bubbling in the water to make foggy vapor, add a couple drops or so of dish soap (I use Dawn) in the water which will trap the carbon dioxide and water vapor in a soapy bubbles. Then you squeeze your hands it will explode the bubbles in your hands releases the gases in a fun fog.  

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