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Quick Crystals with Epsom Salt Experiment Kids Fun Science

How do the Epsom salts crystals grow? Hot water holds more Epsom salts crystals than cold water does. That’s because heated water molecules move farther apart, making room for more of the Epsom salts crystals to dissolve. When no more of the crystals can be dissolved, you have a saturated solution. As this solution cools, the water molecules move closer together again.   Cooling the solution rapidly (in Freezer 10 minutes) encourages fast crystal growth, since there is less room for the dissolved salt in the cooler, denser solution. As the solution cools, the magnesium sulfate atoms run into each…

Trash Bag Pressure Experiment

WARNING: Never put anyones head inside the trash bag. Kids should be over 100 lbs (45kg) as the air pressure is pretty powerful. Also a good idea to have one person behind the person in the bag and another operating the vacuum on and off.   We can’t feel the weight of the atmosphere and don’t even notice it. When the pressure is lower inside the trash bag than the pressure outside the trash bag you notice this change and can feel the atmospheric pressure.   Climb inside a 55-gallon trash bag and then have someone suck out all the…

Slinky Drop Science Experiment

If i drop a Slinky you probably won’t be able to see it what happens, as it happens to fast. In Slow motion you can see the results, but maybe not understand what you saw.   You can see with the slow motion that the bottom end stayed completely still after I let go of the top and waited until the whole shiny came down until the it started to fall.   The bottom end has gravity pulling it down and tension pulling it up. Equal and opposite forces, then when the top of the slimy reaches the bottom there…

Exploding Watermelon with rubber bands

Safety: Wear Safety glasses and do not look directly over the watermelon as it is going to shoot up like a rocket!   This demonstrated show the difference between potential and kinetic energy by exploding a watermelon with rubber bands.   You will need a watermelon, 300-400 rubber bands, some Safety glasses and do this outside. Mom’s don’t think its funny doing this experiment indoors. : )   Put your melon on a table. We use a cardboard box to hold it up right. You will need two volunteers for the experiment as its little hard to pull the rubber…

Amazing inside out hard-boiled egg Experiment

The science behind it is that the yolk of the egg is more dense than the albumen. When you spin the egg rapidly, the runny yolk is drawn towards the edge of the egg via the centrifugal force, while the albumen is pushed to the centre.   If you spin the egg for long enough, the yolk and albumen separate, so that when boiled the egg appears inside out.If you don’t spin it for long enough, the two mix so that you get an instant scrambled egg. This was a lot harder than I thought it was going to be….

Talking tape Experiment

Talking Tape is a plastic strip less than 1/8 inch wide with a thickness 2 or 3 sheets of paper and about 24 inches long. Talk is recorded on one side and easily played by thumbnail.   How it works? Just attach the pointed end of the Talkie Tape to the article you wish to talk. (I used a balloon and paper) Slide the nail of your thumb down the tape. That’s it, that is all there is to it. No player, no batteries, no contraptions, no problems.Try different objects to see which produces a better sound.  

Vocal Visualizer Experiment

Use your voice to transform laser light into dazzling patterns. By humming, singing, or talking into the Vocal Visualizer, you’ll be able to see sound as vibration.   What’s Going On? When you vocalize, you cause air molecules to vibrate. These vibrating molecules strike the rubber balloon membrane. The membrane vibrates, causing the mirror to wiggle in turn. The laser light bounces off this wiggling mirror, tracing out various shapes and patterns that you can see. (That’s why we call this the Vocal Visualizer!) The different amplitudes and frequencies of the sounds emanating from your mouth cause different shapes and…

Wire hanger and string sound experiment

Sound waves are created by the vibration of an object, in this case with a hanger. When vibrations hit your eardrum, your brain interprets the vibrations as sound. The sound waves can travel through air, liquids and solids. When we listen to the hanger hit the wall with the string to our ears, the sound waves are traveling through the solid string and hanger. Since sound waves travel more quickly through solids, we hear the sound more clearly. When we bang the hanger without putting the string to our ears, the sound waves are traveling through air to get to…

Pencil record player and speakers Experiment

Vinyl records have grooves in them. These grooves have bumps and bends that correspond to the recorded music and voices.   As the record turns, the tip of the pin travels within these grooves, following these bumps and bends and causing the pin/needle and cone/cup speaker to vibrate.   The vibrations in the cone/cup cause the air to vibrate. These vibrations then come out from the cone to your ear, which you hear as music, voices, or whatever has been recorded.  

Twirling sound hose experiment

Sound Tubes are our absolute a great hands on sound experiment. When spun in a circular motion, these tubes produce a tone. When swinging it around it creates low pressure at the free end and the higher pressure on the hand end. When whirled in a circle it becomes a simple centrifugal pump. This pressure gradient causes air to flow through the tube. When the air is going through the tube in bounces over the ridges in the tube. Which disrupt the airflow to produce loud, musical tones. The faster the tube is whirled, the higher the pitch of those…

Singing Glasses Toothpick Mover Experiment

As you rub your finger on the rim, your finger first sticks to the glass and then slides. This stick and slide action occurs in very short lengths and produces a vibration inside the glass, which in turn produces a sound. As soon as the first few vibrations are produced, the water in the glass starts to vibrate and create one clear tone. You can change the pitch (highness or lowness of the sound) by adding to or subtracting from the amount of water in the glass. The volume (loud or quiet) can be changed only a little bit by…

Tensor tympani muscle experiment

The tensor tympani is a muscle within the ear. Its role is to dampen sounds, such as those produced from chewing. Contracting muscles produce vibration and sound. The sound is usually described as a rumbling sound   Slow twitch fibers produce 10 to 30 contractions per second (equivalent to 10 to 30 Hz sound frequency). Fast twitch fibers produce 30 to 70 contractions per second (equivalent to 30 to 70 Hz sound frequency). The vibration can be witnessed and felt by highly tensing one’s muscles.   Go to a quiet room and stick your fingers in your ears. What you…

Trick your brain Sound Experiment

Your brain has various ways of detecting where a sound is coming from, but the main one uses the fact that you have two ears (known as binaural hearing). Sound travels at about 330m/s which means that if there is something noisy to your left, the sound will get to your left ear about a 2000th of a second before it arrives at your right ear. This means that the signal will get to your brain this much sooner, and so your brain can calculate that the source of the sound is to your left.   Similarly, if the object…

DIY best Slime recipe

Empty the bottle of glue into a mixing bowl. Add water and mix, then add the liquid starch in increments stirring with each addition. When the slime comes to a doughier consistency Add more starch if needed if slime is sticky. Store in a plastic bag or container. Slime can get moldy so store in the fridge to extend its lifetime.  

Color Changing Slime Experiment

This really was the fun part… Coming up with ways to make the slime change color. Putting it on soda cans, frozen water bottles and heat packs. Holding it with hands that have held something hot or cold. Breathing on it. Using it as a thermometer (the pigments we used go clear at 71.6 ºF so we could tell whether it was hotter or colder than that.) This is really fun experiment. Try different pigment colors with different food coloring.  

St Patricks Day Green Slime

Mix together 1/3 cup (75mL)warm water, 1/2 cup (125mL) Elmer’s glue, then add 6 drops of green food coloring. Stir thoroughly with a spoon and then set aside.   Mix together 3/4 cup warm water and 2 teaspoons Borax. Stir thoroughly with a spoon; pour into mixture a little at a time, stirring continuously until the slime is not sticky anymore.   Remove globe from bowl and work in your hands for 2 to 3 minutes. Store in resealable plastic bag or air-tight container. (Tip: If mixture starts to dry out, pour a small amount of water over it and…

St Patrick Day Green Carnations experiment

I kept my carnation out of water for 2 hours before I placed it in the color water.   This is a great hands-on experiment with your kiddos. Don’t pass up those white carnations in the stores. Your going to be able to witness Capillary Action of water in plants.   Most of the time, plants get their water from the ground. This means that the plant has to transport the water from its roots up throughout the rest of the plant. How is this done?   Well good question, Water moves through the plant by means of Capillary action….

Fireworks in a jar Experiment

Fireworks in a jar – Oil and water don’t mix because of how their molecules are constructed. Water is what is known as a polar molecule and Vegetable oil, on the other hand, is a nonpolar molecule.   You also noticed that food coloring only mixes with water . . . and now you know why. Food coloring is a polar molecule because it dissolves in water. In other words, food coloring and water are miscible. Vegetable oil is not affected by the food coloring because they are polar opposites.   The oil is less dense than the water, it…

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