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Wire hanger and string sound experiment

Sound waves are created by the vibration of an object, in this case with a hanger. When vibrations hit your eardrum, your brain interprets the vibrations as sound. The sound waves can travel through air, liquids and solids. When we listen to the hanger hit the wall with the string to our ears, the sound waves are traveling through the solid string and hanger. Since sound waves travel more quickly through solids, we hear the sound more clearly. When we bang the hanger without putting the string to our ears, the sound waves are traveling through air to get to…

Pencil record player and speakers Experiment

Vinyl records have grooves in them. These grooves have bumps and bends that correspond to the recorded music and voices.   As the record turns, the tip of the pin travels within these grooves, following these bumps and bends and causing the pin/needle and cone/cup speaker to vibrate.   The vibrations in the cone/cup cause the air to vibrate. These vibrations then come out from the cone to your ear, which you hear as music, voices, or whatever has been recorded.  

Twirling sound hose experiment

Sound Tubes are our absolute a great hands on sound experiment. When spun in a circular motion, these tubes produce a tone. When swinging it around it creates low pressure at the free end and the higher pressure on the hand end. When whirled in a circle it becomes a simple centrifugal pump. This pressure gradient causes air to flow through the tube. When the air is going through the tube in bounces over the ridges in the tube. Which disrupt the airflow to produce loud, musical tones. The faster the tube is whirled, the higher the pitch of those…

Singing Glasses Toothpick Mover Experiment

As you rub your finger on the rim, your finger first sticks to the glass and then slides. This stick and slide action occurs in very short lengths and produces a vibration inside the glass, which in turn produces a sound. As soon as the first few vibrations are produced, the water in the glass starts to vibrate and create one clear tone. You can change the pitch (highness or lowness of the sound) by adding to or subtracting from the amount of water in the glass. The volume (loud or quiet) can be changed only a little bit by…

Tensor tympani muscle experiment

The tensor tympani is a muscle within the ear. Its role is to dampen sounds, such as those produced from chewing. Contracting muscles produce vibration and sound. The sound is usually described as a rumbling sound   Slow twitch fibers produce 10 to 30 contractions per second (equivalent to 10 to 30 Hz sound frequency). Fast twitch fibers produce 30 to 70 contractions per second (equivalent to 30 to 70 Hz sound frequency). The vibration can be witnessed and felt by highly tensing one’s muscles.   Go to a quiet room and stick your fingers in your ears. What you…

Trick your brain Sound Experiment

Your brain has various ways of detecting where a sound is coming from, but the main one uses the fact that you have two ears (known as binaural hearing). Sound travels at about 330m/s which means that if there is something noisy to your left, the sound will get to your left ear about a 2000th of a second before it arrives at your right ear. This means that the signal will get to your brain this much sooner, and so your brain can calculate that the source of the sound is to your left.   Similarly, if the object…

DIY best Slime recipe

Empty the bottle of glue into a mixing bowl. Add water and mix, then add the liquid starch in increments stirring with each addition. When the slime comes to a doughier consistency Add more starch if needed if slime is sticky. Store in a plastic bag or container. Slime can get moldy so store in the fridge to extend its lifetime.  

Color Changing Slime Experiment

This really was the fun part… Coming up with ways to make the slime change color. Putting it on soda cans, frozen water bottles and heat packs. Holding it with hands that have held something hot or cold. Breathing on it. Using it as a thermometer (the pigments we used go clear at 71.6 ºF so we could tell whether it was hotter or colder than that.) This is really fun experiment. Try different pigment colors with different food coloring.  

St Patricks Day Green Slime

Mix together 1/3 cup (75mL)warm water, 1/2 cup (125mL) Elmer’s glue, then add 6 drops of green food coloring. Stir thoroughly with a spoon and then set aside.   Mix together 3/4 cup warm water and 2 teaspoons Borax. Stir thoroughly with a spoon; pour into mixture a little at a time, stirring continuously until the slime is not sticky anymore.   Remove globe from bowl and work in your hands for 2 to 3 minutes. Store in resealable plastic bag or air-tight container. (Tip: If mixture starts to dry out, pour a small amount of water over it and…

St Patrick Day Green Carnations experiment

I kept my carnation out of water for 2 hours before I placed it in the color water.   This is a great hands-on experiment with your kiddos. Don’t pass up those white carnations in the stores. Your going to be able to witness Capillary Action of water in plants.   Most of the time, plants get their water from the ground. This means that the plant has to transport the water from its roots up throughout the rest of the plant. How is this done?   Well good question, Water moves through the plant by means of Capillary action….

Fireworks in a jar Experiment

Fireworks in a jar – Oil and water don’t mix because of how their molecules are constructed. Water is what is known as a polar molecule and Vegetable oil, on the other hand, is a nonpolar molecule.   You also noticed that food coloring only mixes with water . . . and now you know why. Food coloring is a polar molecule because it dissolves in water. In other words, food coloring and water are miscible. Vegetable oil is not affected by the food coloring because they are polar opposites.   The oil is less dense than the water, it…

WORLD’s FASTEST Naked Egg (Rubber Egg, Bouncy Egg) Experiment

I’m going to show you how to make a naked egg lighting FAST. When you use Calcium, Lime, Rust Remover (CLR) your naked egg will be ready in under 2 hours. Make sure you read the cautions on the container. I used gloves, in a ventilated area and googles. Adult supervision is required.   CLR is guaranteed to be the easiest and fastest method of quickly dissolving calcium. Hence the name Calcium Lime Rust remover.   The reason the egg shell dissolves in White Vinegar, Red Wine Calcium, Lime, and Rust Stain Remover is the Acid breaks apart the calcium…

EPIC Naked Egg fold, toss and shape! (Rubber Egg, Bouncy Egg)

If you have done the Naked egg experiment before, your going to love this experiment, as we take it to the next level.   Only different on set up is you use a pushpin to make holes on both ends of the egg. Then use a skewer to break yolk. Be careful not to break the shell. Then use Vinegar or CLR (See below where to buy) CRL will remove the shell in under 2 hours, where vinegar takes 24 to 48 hours. (See Lighting FAST Naked Egg video below) You will never use vinegar again.   Then blow out…

Oobleck Non-Newtonian liquid experiment

Ingredients • 2 Cups Cornstarch • 1 Cup Water • Food coloring (optional)   Instructions • Step One – Pour 2 cups cornstarch into a bowl • Step Two – Add 1 cup of water and stir to combine • Step Three – If adding food coloring to your Oobleck do it at the mixing stage   What is the consistency you are looking for? If you’ve never made Oobleck before one of the hardest things to figure out is just what you are looking for in terms of consistency. I use this as my guideline: When mixed you should…

Can You Walk on Water? (Non-Newtonian Fluid Pool)

15 boxes of Cornstarch and were walking on Oobleck! Mix one box at a time in a separate bowl and then poured into the tub.   What is happening? You’ve essentially made homemade quicksand or a large tub of oobleck. Corn starch in water displays interesting properties. Under some conditions, it behaves as a liquid, while under other conditions, it acts as a solid. If you punch the mixture, it will be like hitting a wall, yet you can sink your feet or body into it like water. If you squeeze it, it feels firm, yet when you release the…

Facing the Unknown, with Robots | Shai Revzen | TEDxUofM

Is there anyway we can prepare to face the unknown? Can we develop robots that are fluid in function?   Shai Revzen is an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, Ecologyand Evolutionary Biology, and Robotics at the University of Michigan. He’s been a video game programmer, an experimental biologist, and Chief Architect in a Silicon Valley tech company. He has co-founded a biomedical start-up, authored several patents, and published academically in robotics, biology, and applied mathematics.  

Prof. Edwin Olson

Prof. Olson’s research includes finding ways for robots to sense and understand their environment while coping with uncertainty and ambiguity. The perception problem is central to a variety of practical applications, from indoor robots that can lead tours or deliver mail to autonomous cars that can navigate urban environments. His work includes both fundamental algorithm research (optimization, state estimation, classification) and system building.  

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