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MakerBot Stories | Ringblingz

From his 100-square-foot home office, product designer Bill Phelps brought more than a dozen products to market in a year for an $80 million consumer-product-goods company.   Then Phelps joined Ringblingz, a startup that makes rings that allow teenagers to put their phones away yet know when they have an important message. During a three-month residency at the R/GA Connected Devices Accelerator powered by Techstars, Phelps was able to work through hundreds of designs using a MakerBot Replicator 2 Desktop 3D Printer. Ringblingz launched at SXSW last month, and Wearables Week named them Best Newcomer.   Phelps says there’s no…

MakerBot Stories | Orbotix

Ian Bernstein, cofounder and CTO of connected toy company Orbotix, created the breakthrough prototype of Ollie, a remote control vehicle, on a MakerBot Replicator 2 Desktop 3D Printer.   “When we started Orbotix, I was building all the Sphero prototypes with paper clips and brass and stuff like that, and you can only go so far,” Bernstein said. “Having the MakerBot and being able to make more advanced parts, we’re doing bigger and better things now.”  

Makerbot Stories | GE FirstBuild

Once GE FirstBuild added MakerBot® Replicator® 3D Printers to their toolkit, they were able to prototype and test the next generation of smart home appliances in real time. In the words of the company, “a prototype is worth a thousand meetings.” Learn how GE FirstBuild saves time and encourages innovation with the help of MakerBot Replicators.  

MakerBot PRO Series: Bike Seat Design

Watch and learn how one industrial designer can go from from idea, to sketch, to CAD, to 3D printing – all in a weekend.   This story is part of MakerBot’s series of design studies, exploring iterative design and the relationship between designers and their tools.  

3D Printed iPhone Case with Moving Gears!

These personalized iPhone cases, designed by Danny Tasmakis were 3D printed on an Objet Connex multi-material 3D printer and feature moving interlocking gear wheels! This is the only 3D printer of its kind in the world able to create complex assemblies made of moving parts – each of which is printed in a different material. In this video, you see a small selection from among the total Stratasys range of 107 materials, including transparent, black, transparent with patterned dots and grid lines, white and various composite grey/blue shades.  

Printing a Giant Wrench with a 3D Printer

3D printers can be used to create virtually any object directly from a computer-aided design. This video shows how a Stratasys Objet Connex 3D printer can produce 6 different sizes of adjustable wrenches – from 5 cm to 50 cm – all in one print run. All the wrenches contain fully-movable parts and require no assembly after printing. The wrenches are made of Digital ABS material which has the strength of ABS-grade engineering plastics.  

Having Fun with a 3D Printed Gear Cube!

This cube made of inter-locking gear wheels was printed on a Stratasys Objet 3D Printer. The material used here is VeroClear transparent material. The cube emerges already fully assembled from the 3D printer. As you can see, there is no residue support material – the gears interlock accurately and smoothly – a testament to the Stratasys Objet 3D printer’s high resolution print quality.  

Testing a Baseball Bat Created on a 3D Printer

We create a fully-functional baseball bat prototype on an Stratasys Objet Connex Multi-Material 3D Printer and test it against a variety of objects to see if it breaks. The bat is printed in the Stratasys Digital ABS Material – a very strong and functionally versatile composite material that is unique to the Stratasys Objet Connex range of 3D printers. Even though the bat has a very thin neck supporting a heavy end, it does not shatter or splinter upon hard contact with various objects.  

EuroMold 2011 – A First Peak!

Sam Green takes a first look at EuroMold 2011 and the Objet stand, including a look at some of the amazing 3D models and prototypes on display. EuroMold is the primary European event for rapid prototyping, additive manufacturing and 3D printing.  

Tiny 3D Printed Car! (With Moving Wheels)

These tiny 3D printed cars were printed on the Stratasys Objet Eden 3D printer and scale down from 4 cm in length to a tiny 1cm in length. Even in the tiniest car, the wheels remain fully functional and there is no deformation of walls or loss of fine details – highlighting the enormous power of the Stratasys Objet line of 3D printers to turn CAD designs into visually and functionally accurate prototypes.  

Amazing 3D Printed Racing Car Steering Wheels with Tiny Writing!

Gary Miller at IPF, a 3D printing and rapid prototyping service bureau in the UK sends Sam Green at Objet a series of 3D printed steering wheels, printed on the Objet Connex500 multi-material 3D printer. The steering wheels, a combination of Objet VeroWhitePlus rigid material with overmolded TangoBlack rubber-like material, feature tiny 3D printed writing, which remains visible and accurate down to a fraction of a mm.  

EuroMold 2011 – 3D Printed Car Dashboard!

Jonathan Jaglom (VP Sales Operations, Objet) walks us through the Objet stand at EuroMold with a look at some of the applications created in the company’s new Digital ABS Material, including this full-size, functional 3D printed car dashboard, 3D printed injection molding plates and 3D printed skateboard.  

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