Atal Tinkering Labs ATL

   

Hi Current FET OUTPUT Board For Use with an Arduino Duemilanove Micro Controller.

MIcro- Processor Controlled High Current FET OUTPUT Card 80 Continuous Current and 195 Amp Peak Current. PWM 0 to 100% Duty Cycle In 1% Increments or Automatic Current Set POINT and or temperature Set point or both. The Board has built in Current sensor for 100 AMPS and a temperature Sensor for the FET Heat Sink, A external temperature sensor will be available as well for connection to the cell and or an other device such as your alternator.  

Arduino Tutorial – LCD Display Control

The LCDs have a parallel interface, meaning that the microcontroller has to manipulate several interface pins at once to control the display. The interface consists of the following pins: – A register select (RS) pin that controls where in the LCD’s memory you’re writing data to. You can select either the data register, which holds what goes on the screen, or an instruction register, which is where the LCD’s controller looks for instructions on what to do next. – A Read/Write (R/W) pin that selects reading mode or writing mode – An Enable pin that enables writing to the registers…

Arduino Tutorial – Stepper Motor Control with L293D Motor Driver

In this tutorial you will learn how to control a stepper motor using your L293D motor control chip   Stepper motors fall somewhere in between a regular DC motor and a servo motor. They have the advantage that they can be positioned accurately, moved forward or backwards one ‘step’ at a time, but they can also rotate continuously.  

Arduino Tutorial – Stepper Motor Control with Potentiometer

This tutorial is all about tuning the speed of a stepper motor using a potentiometer. The idea is to up or down the speed of a stepper motor using with analog read. Theoretically analog input to a digital output, we’re going to use this concept to control the speed of a running stepper motor.   The Stepper motor used here is a rusty old EPOCH (5 wires) stepper motor, which is a unipolar stepper.   Use the analog input with the help potentiometer to control the delay in-between each steps of the stepper motor. Shorter the delay in-between each steps…

Arduino Tutorial – Servo Motor Control with Motor Shield

Hobby servos are the easiest way to get going with motor control. They have a 3-pin 0.1″ female header connection with +5V, ground and signal inputs. The motor shield simply brings out the PWM output lines from Arduino pins 9 and 10 to two 3-pin headers so that its easy to plug in and go. They can take a lot of power so a 9V battery wont last more than a few minutes! The nice thing about using the onboard PWM is that its very precise and goes about its business in the background. You can use the built in…

Arduino Tutorial – Servo Motor Control with Potentiometer

Servo motors have three wires: power, ground, and signal. The power wire is typically red, and should be connected to the 5V pin on the Arduino or Genuino board. The ground wire is typically black or brown and should be connected to a ground pin on the board. The signal pin is typically yellow or orange and should be connected to pin 9 on the board.   The potentiometer should be wired so that its two outer pins are connected to power (+5V) and ground, and its middle pin is connected to analog input 0 on the board.   I…

Arduino Tutorial – Servo Motor with an External Power

Servo, can be powered by another power source without Arduino power. Only thing important here is that all the GND are connected to each other. Like this you can add as many servo motors as you want.   Important! If you will use high voltage battery and you want give power to arduino with same power source, you need to put a 7805 voltage regulator in, and make a parallel circuit for that too.  

error: Context Menu disabled!